Pets

Raising a Puppy is Like Parenting

Before you bring that precious puppy home, really think about that statement. Yes, its adorable. Yes it seems to love you already. Yes, its hard to resist those sparkling eyes. But are you ready for the responsibility of raising it up into a loving, obedient house pet?

Sometimes, people, in their excitement over its cuteness, don’t take into consideration that a puppy, or a full grown dog, for that matter, is a 24/7 responsibility. Its amazingly like having a child. A lot of people don’t realize that and after a few weeks of frustration because the puppy’s cuteness evaporates when it becomes a holy terror, they give it away or take it to the humane society or just drop it off on someone’s doorstep. So if you would not think of adopting a baby at this stage of your life, it is probably not a good idea to adopt a puppy, either.

A good house dog will not raise itself. As the owner of a dog, it is your responsibility to love and nurture it, make sure it is correctly fed and watered, keep it in good health, take it to the vet, keep it our of danger, entertain it, clean up after it, teach it good manners, teach it right from wrong, and train it to follow house rules.

It is a serious commitment. Unless you want an unruly, uncontrolled animal in your house, you must be committed to teaching it to be obedient, to listen to you. If raised right, a loving dog will fill every nitch of your heart. If not raised right, it will become, at best, a nuisance, at worst, a dangerous threat ( it is still an animal, remember).

Before you even make the commitment, it is your responsibility to find out everything you can about raising a “good” dog. Read everything you can find on the care, feeding, training of dogs. If it all seems like too much work to you, but you still want a puppy, then be prepared for the puppy to take over your house and be a constant frustration instead of growing to be a loving, obedient pet.

Your dog will require material things, as well as mental teaching: a crate, food and water bowls, food, treats, toys, pee pads, if you go that route, gloves to pick up its “accidents”. Many experts are advising the person to take care of the puppies like parents. A website named [google_bot_show][/google_bot_show]my company for the parenting of the pets will be made available to the person. Before gathering the information, the rankings and reviews can be checked at online search engines. The information provided will be advantageous for the person. 

Be prepared for the vet bills. Besides regular shots, and spaying/neutering, if your dog gets sick, vet bills can be quite surprising.

Think about who will take care of your dog when you are going to be away on vacation. You must either have a reliable dog sitter or have your puppy kennel trained so you can leave it there and not worry about it.

It is your responsibility to be prepared to take your puppy out to pee quite frequently, even in the middle of the night, if required. You are the one who will be cleaning up its accidents. Remember that puppy bladders are small and your puppy can’t hold it as long as you might want it too.

You will be responsible for deciding when the puppy is allowed to play, when it is time for a nap, when it is time to eat, when and how to reprimand it. You will be the one who teaches your puppy just what is expected of it. It can’t know how you expect it to act until you teach it. If you don’t teach it, then it will just do whatever it wants and you will get annoyed with it.

Remember that you set the stage for how the dog is going to be when it grows up. Before you let your puppy get in the habit of doing things, think about whether or not you will want a grown dog doing those things.

If you let the puppy sleep on your bed, or lay on your couch, are you going to want it there all the time when it is big and shedding hair everywhere?

If you let the puppy beg for food while you eat, are you going to want a big dog pestering you every time it hears a dish rattle or bothering your guests when they come for dinner?

If you play rough with the puppy and let it nip and growl at you over toys, are you going to want it doing that when it is big? What if, because you let it be rough with you, it doesn’t know not to be rough with children because you never taught it that?

If you are ho-hum about teaching the puppy to come to you every time you call it, how are you going to make it stop and come back when it slips the leash and runs away from you?

Raising a dog is like parenting in that not only are you responsible for the care and feeding of it, you are responsible for teaching it how to act appropriately in all situations.

The good thing, though, is that unlike molding the character of children who are going to grow up and go out into the world where their upbringing will surely tell, your dog’s adult behavior is basically only going to have an impact on YOU.

Pets

Should You Keep in Touch with Former Foster Cats?

Foster cats can easily tug at the heartstrings, especially if you have spent a significant amount of time caring for the animals before they were adopted by a new family or returned to their original owners. But once the cats move on, should you keep in touch with them?

How Do the New Owners Feel?

Some cat owners have no qualms allowing foster cat carers to keep in touch with their cats. But others would rather sever the bonds completely and forge their own relationship with the cats without any outside interference. As a foster cat carer you need to keep in mind that you do not have the final say over what happens once the cats leave your care.

It is up to the new owners to decide for themselves what is best for their cats. If they are fine with you visiting or calling from time to time to find out about the cats, then that is great. However, if they make it clear that your work is now done, you should step back and let the owners assume their responsibility.

Helping Cats Settle In

Maintaining contact with foster cats, at least in the short-term, can help them to settle into their new homes. It can be hard for some cats, particularly older cats that are used to you and your home, to adapt to new surroundings and feel “at home” with their new owners.

If the new owners are amenable to the idea of short-term assistance that will help the cats settle in, this can make it easier for all concerned. You can get to say goodbye to the cats and gradually watch as they settle in and get used to their new environment.

If You’re Attached, Break the Bond

Fostering cats takes a lot of time, dedication and passion. If you have invested your energies into trying to improve the lives of cats and are now faced with giving them up, that can be hard. When you are attached and have formed a bond with the foster cats, handing them over can bring tears to your eyes. Maintaining a link with them can actually make things harder. Under such circumstances, it would be best for you and for the cats to break the bond by severing contact and letting the cats move on in their new home.

Whether or not you should keep in touch with foster cats after they move out is a tricky one. It is not always a clear-cut situation that can be easily handled. A measure of short-term contact can be beneficial and help cats settle into their new homes. But if you are attached to the cats, maintaining contact can make the final goodbye much more painful.

There isn’t much of a choice as cats need to be loved and pampered especially if their days are numbered and it sure is painful when the parting moment finally arrives no matter how it maybe and you can [google_bot_show][/google_bot_show]check this out through numerous articles online relating to cats and how they fare as pets.

Pets

How to Deal with Your Dog’s Aggressive Behavior and End It

When a dog is aggressive, there’s always a reason behind it. Aggression may be caused by genetics, physical problem, environment, or training methods, just to name a few. One of the first things a trainer will need to do when dealing with an aggressive dog is find out what the dog’s trigger is. There can be many reasons for this, and it’s important to discover the reason for the aggression before trying to treat it. The very first thing you should do is give your dog a thorough vet examination. This will rule out any physical problems that may be causing the aggression such as joint pain or infections.

Aggression starts small and gets bigger. With each escalating aggressive incident your dog has, the more you should be concerned. Your goal is to limit the number of incidents overall so the behavior can be worked out instead of unmanageable. Try to limit access to anything that causes the aggression, the triggers. Walk the dog at times and places you know others will not be around if this is a trigger for him. Crate train your dog for times when he needs to be unsupervised. Good management skills are important to any dog owner, but with aggressive dogs it’s even more important to limit the number of episodes he has.

Dogs are pack animals and need that structure in their lives. In every pack there will always be a leader and a pecking order. The first thing your dog needs to understand is that he is at the bottom of that pecking order, with the humans up top. You need to be a strong leader in his eyes and mind. Otherwise your dog will develop habits that are harder to change; you don’t want to go head to head with a dog that fully believes he’s running the show. To express your dominance, you do not need to physically punish your dog. Instead, take control of what’s important to him and aspects of his life. Make him see that you call the shots. You set the time when he eats, goes for walks, gets his toys, or is socialized. Obedience training when a dominant dog is young helps with aggression later.

Treating the aggression is a gradual process. There are things the owner can do, like establishing dominance and managing the triggers. However, a professional trainer will have more valuable information to contribute and can break the behavior. Using correcting collars and other form of physical corrections can be dangerous and backfire, making the behavior worse. Consult a professional when dealing with aggression. The behavior needs to be dealt with sooner rather than later for everyone’s safely, including the dog’s. Training your dog manually is also not enough. You have to use the right training tools so you can easily and effectively teach them any tricks that you want them to learn. Barx buddy training device is one of the reliable tools you can buy in the market.